Do you get feedback from your players?

Do you ever seek feedback from your players after training? If so, what questions do you ask? What responses do you get? And how have you used their responses to shape your sessions moving forward?

If you haven't tried asking your players for feedback before, Adam Dunleavy has set you the following challenge on the latest episode of Coachcast:

"Get some feedback after sessions from your players. Ask the group questions about your sessions. Are they having fun? Are they enjoying it? What did they like about it? And what might you be able to change to make them enjoy it even more?

"The challenge should be about taking the opportunity to be vulnerable because sometimes we ask the questions and don't always love the answers that we get back, or we find them surprising. Try to connect with how your players are perceiving your sessions. Also, let us know how being vulnerable felt, what did you learn, and what do you plan to do with the information?"

As always, we'd love to hear your thoughts on this, so post your comments below! Arrow down

Parents
  • We don't do it always, but I always ask one (usually my son) about how he feels it went - he's open enough to know he can keep it honest! We also get it informally now - the kids come to us at the start of training with ideas on what they'd like to do or see enhance a drill. Sometimes we do it, sometimes we do a different variation, but always have a conversation about it. 

  • Great to hear you've given this a try, Euan. And it's also great to hear that your players are happy to talk to you about their ideas - it shows you must've created a good environment for them!

    When you have implemented one of their ideas before, what reaction did you get from them? Did they enjoy the fact they influenced training?

  • Yes they did - but it's then a fine line between them influencing and perhaps them thinking they can control the content and us losing discipline. Hence it's a balance, and if we don't take their suggestions we always explain why - there is a good level of respect both ways. 

    We always take time to explain the drills, but asking them first why we're doing drills and what they think it's working on. Always it's then related to something that is game relevant. So if it's short sharp passing, why is that important? If it's through the lines, when would they see that in a game. We then do it one more time so they can put it in context. They may chip in with comments at this point, and we may or may add them in. 

    I would say though - it's taken years to get to this level and a fairly consistent core group of kids. We're not shouty coaches (in defeat or in discipline) and I think that helps the kids enjoy their football and what we ask of them in training and matches. We spend a lot of time prepping sessions to make them varied and interesting and it shows on their engagement. 

  • Thanks for sharing more info, Euan. This sounds great. And you make a really good point for any coaches that are reading this thread; that it has taken time to get to this stage. And over that time it really sounds like you've created an environment that your players enjoy and one that will help them to thrive. Keep up the good work!

Reply
  • Thanks for sharing more info, Euan. This sounds great. And you make a really good point for any coaches that are reading this thread; that it has taken time to get to this stage. And over that time it really sounds like you've created an environment that your players enjoy and one that will help them to thrive. Keep up the good work!

Children
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